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Takin’ It To The Heart Part 2: New Insights on Managing Heartworm Disease in Shelter Animals - Shared screen with speaker view
José Pedro Amaral Leitão
32:18
hello!
João Paulo Leitão
32:36
hi, good evening
Brian DiGangi
32:56
Welcome back Jose and Joao - nice to "see" you both again!
José Pedro Amaral Leitão
33:40
it is our pleasure to attend one more webinar and learn :)
Brian DiGangi
34:20
Elizabeth Warren is here...sweet.
José Pedro Amaral Leitão
37:48
private practice, Portugal
April Willoby
37:49
Hello. April with Grafelman Farms Rescue in Pekin, IL
Carrie Good
37:53
Friends of Jacksonville Animals, Jacksonville, FL
Andrew Riebe
37:54
Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control, Indiana, USA
Erin Doyle
37:54
Erin Doyle, ASPCA, MA, USA
Brenna Jennings
37:54
ASPCA, remote in my NH USA home office. Welcome everyone!
Ed Marits
37:55
Second Chance Animal Rescue of Mount Vernon VA USA
VIRGINIA BRANTLEY
37:58
Georgia Heartland Humane Soceity Newnan GA USA
Carol Christensen
37:58
Oregon Humane Society, Oregon, USA
Lacy Kuller
37:59
Chesapeake Humane Society, Virginia, USA
Patti Gorby
37:59
North Country Pet Adoption Services NYS
João Paulo Leitão
38:03
Portugal
Kristina Baucom
38:05
Michigan State Univeristy, MI, USA
Gerryll Hall
38:05
Merck, Atlanta, GA
Laura Warner
38:05
Retired, USA California
Allyson Forbes
38:05
Rochester Animal Services, Rochester, NY
Louise Poirier
38:10
Kalamazoo, Mi USA
Matt Stark
38:11
HATS Lincoln County NC
Julie Wynn
38:13
Murray County Georgia
Peggy Tolbert
38:14
Peggy Tolbert, Humane Society of Burnett County Webster WI
Rimme Singh
38:15
Rimme Singh Humane Society of Broward County, FL
Brandea Taylor
38:16
Hello. Brandea from Humane Pennsylvania, Lancaster and Reading PA
Melissa Lacey
38:18
Humane Society of Harris County GA
Kristin Thompson
38:19
South Africa
Connie Philipp
38:41
Connie Philipp Desoto Parish Animal Services
Arnette Small
38:50
Iowa County Humane Society , Wisconsin
Erin Doyle
40:52
Hi Sandi! Most heartworm prevention is labeled for 8 weeks of age and older so we recommend starting at 8 weeks.
Patti Gorby
43:02
Before
Ed Marits
43:04
Spay
April Willoby
43:06
Spay after treatment
Melissa Lacey
43:09
Before starting doxy and pred
José Pedro Amaral Leitão
43:11
maybe thedecision will depend on clinical status of the pet
Sonia Tauzin
43:12
We spay if there are no clinical signs.
Gerryll Hall
43:15
Spay based on health
Joshua Dwuznik
43:15
Before
Arnette Small
43:15
wait , depending on health
Lacy Kuller
43:16
Depends on severity of disease but in most cases spay/neuter before treatement
Rimme Singh
43:18
Before as long as no clinical signs
Kristin Thompson
43:21
spay after treatment depending on clinical signs
Louise Poirier
43:29
spay/neuter first, test then. MI
Erin Doyle
44:30
Great question Jessica. Yes, it is common for dogs to continue to test positive initially after treatment. It can take up to around 6 months before an antigen test will be negative.
Gerryll Hall
47:29
Based on physical exam
Lacy Kuller
47:30
Spay before txt, dental after
Patti Gorby
47:32
after test comes back neg?
Erin Doyle
48:10
As a reminder to all - please select "All panelists and attendees" for your answers and questions!
José Pedro Amaral Leitão
53:17
laarvae and mosquito
Patti Gorby
53:17
baby hw and ?
Kristin Thompson
53:18
microfilaria, mosquito
Janis Silveri
53:21
Treat with doxy first, then dog can be transported.
Julaine Hunter
53:32
Proof of negative adult and microfilaria test.
Erin Doyle
56:44
Julianne - that's a great point about the cost of spay-neuter. Recommendations may vary for an owned dog versus in a shelter setting for which by and large the benefits of spay-neuter before treatment outweigh the negative aspects including cost. But it's important to consider all aspects of the scenario.
Gerryll Hall
01:00:23
Confinement
VIRGINIA BRANTLEY
01:00:27
after treatment restrict activity
Lacy Kuller
01:00:32
Ours are in foster homes, on low activity
Khendrea Wilson
01:00:32
Pre treatment we allow play, after treatment no play for 4 weeks
Julaine Hunter
01:00:36
No running for 8 wks post last injection.
Melissa Lacey
01:00:39
Restrict exercise in 2nd 2 months of treatment
Patti Gorby
01:00:41
no exercise after treatment
Janis Silveri
01:00:43
Depends on symptoms.
Karen Krebs
01:00:46
stricy crate rest for 1 month
Sarah Hicks
01:03:49
can you discuss exercise restriction for animals NOT being treated in shelter/ not being treated prior to adoption
Erin Doyle
01:06:09
Great question Sarah. We can see if Dr. DiGangi has time to address this further during the Q&A period, but in general it will vary based on the dog and degree of clinical signs. It's often a matter of finding the right balance between some degree of restriction with enough enrichment/exercise to maintain the dog's behavioral health.
Patti Gorby
01:06:38
Depends on how severe the infection was
Sonia Tauzin
01:06:41
Element of truth to it.
Sara Jones
01:06:45
False. My dog has ben clear for 4 years and happy and healthy.
Louise Poirier
01:06:49
possible, but rare
Lacy Kuller
01:06:51
Could be true but unlikely in early infection
VIRGINIA BRANTLEY
01:06:53
depends on the case
Erin Doyle
01:06:57
As a reminder please answer to "All panelists and attendees"!
Janis Silveri
01:06:58
If heart is compromised chance of problem. Otherwise, not as critical.
Joshua Dwuznik
01:07:01
Possible, but generally not true
Christi Cooper
01:07:13
many factors to consider: age, condition, severity of infection
Laura Warner
01:07:43
I lost a dog 5 years after hw treatment due to hw dz.
Melissa Turner
01:12:34
yes, retreat the dog
Patti Gorby
01:12:39
no
Sarah Hicks
01:12:39
wait the full 6 months
Karen Krebs
01:12:47
slow kill method
Khendrea Wilson
01:12:48
wait the 6 months
Arnette Small
01:12:48
yes
José Pedro Amaral Leitão
01:12:49
HAS PREVENTION BEEN DONE. DEFINITELY YES, TREAT
Lacy Kuller
01:12:50
wait full 6 months to test
Jeanne Amos
01:12:50
Wait
Joshua Dwuznik
01:12:50
No. Wait and retest.
Laura Warner
01:12:51
yes
Janis Silveri
01:12:54
retest at 6 mos
VIRGINIA BRANTLEY
01:12:59
no only is symptoms wait the 6 months
Gerryll Hall
01:12:59
No, wait an appropriate amount of time
Christi Cooper
01:13:02
check the test for false positive
Julaine Hunter
01:13:02
I do 3 treatments
Ginger Smith
01:13:03
Yes wait full 6 months
Patti Gorby
01:15:40
has it changed from 6 to 9 months for recommended retesting?
Erin Doyle
01:17:14
Great question Patti. This is an adjustment in recommendations for post-treatment retesting.
Erin Doyle
01:18:04
Jessica, in regards to retesting frequency - regular re-testing isn't necessary. It's sufficient to retest 6-9 months after treatment.
Melissa Lacey
01:18:24
Do you mean 1 injection then 2 injections a month later for the 2nd treatment?
Jeanne Amos
01:18:51
How long to treat with doxy?
Erin Doyle
01:19:32
Sally - great questions. If a recheck Ag test is negative after treatment it is reasonable to consider the dog negative. In the majority of cases, it is recommended to proceed with adoption rather than hold dogs until retesting.
Rimme Singh
01:20:19
I see in this slide that they treated with Doxy for 21 days… Is that acceptable?
Erin Doyle
01:20:55
Thanks for the clarification Jessica! I would recommend proceeding with an adoption with a disclosure regarding the treatment history rather than holding a dog for retesting.
Erin Doyle
01:21:54
Melissa - I believe in that particular case only two treatments were performed, slightly different than the ideal protocol.
Erin Doyle
01:22:25
Rimme - good catch. Generally the recommendation is still to treat with four weeks of doxycycline.
Rimme Singh
01:22:49
Thanks Erin!
Sarah Hicks
01:24:06
any updates on doxycycline vs minocycline
Erin Doyle
01:24:09
Great question Megan, it's a common scenario. We can see if Dr. DiGangi has time to address this in the Q&A as well, but 30 days of doxycycline uninterrupted is recommended. I would generally error on the side of restarting the doxycycline if the course is interrupted.
José Pedro Amaral Leitão
01:24:14
thank you for great session :)
Ed Marits
01:24:14
Please reput up the resource page
Ed Marits
01:24:23
TY
Ed Marits
01:24:45
Where do we find the brochure
Matt Stark
01:24:53
Do you have any feelings on the ProHeart injection regimen? It’s a variation of the slow kill.
Patti Gorby
01:25:22
We do the 2 injection protocol. One of our adopters followed up and did the third injection after adoption, which I think is a great option to give adopters. Does the third injection need to happen exactly one month after the other 2, or is there some leeway?
Khendrea Wilson
01:27:16
I may have missed this but how soon should a knott's test be done following treatment? Is this type of testing recommended post treatment for a high population facility
ASPCApro ProLearning
01:27:36
Please participate in our attendee poll, it should be up on your screen and helps us see how well we are doing!
Patti Gorby
01:27:45
My rescue partners down south sometimes want to load the dog on transport within the week of the injections, which makes me nervous. Is waiting a couple weeks okay, or not worth it for risk
Matt Stark
01:30:00
I’ve heard that the slow kill approach is more likely to cause encapsulation of dead worms and create more long term complications versus the fast kill, shortening the dog’s life. Is that correct?
Christi Cooper
01:32:34
thanks!
José Pedro Amaral Leitão
01:35:55
Thank you
Khendrea Wilson
01:36:06
thanks
Jeanne Amos
01:36:09
Thank you! VERY informative!
Laura Roth
01:36:15
Thanks
Melissa Lacey
01:36:19
thank you
Julie Levy
01:36:28
Excellent presentation!
Connie Philipp
01:36:28
Much appreciated!
Rimme Singh
01:36:36
Thanks!
Sarah Hicks
01:36:37
Thank you!
Julaine Hunter
01:36:39
Thank you! Great resources. :D
Kristin Thompson
01:36:39
thank you